Mold

Introduction

Fungi (mold) are present almost everywhere. In an indoor environment hundreds of different kinds of mold are able to grow wherever there is moisture and an organic substrate (food source).

 

They can grow on building and other materials, including: the paper on gypsum wallboard (drywall); ceiling tiles; wood products; paint; wallpaper; carpeting; some furnishings; books/papers; clothes; and other fabrics.

 

Mold can also grow on moist, dirty surfaces such as concrete, fiberglass insulation, and ceramic tiles. It is neither possible nor warranted to eliminate the presence of all indoor fungal spores and fragments; however, mold growth indoors can and should be prevented and removed if present. 

Before

After

For the majority of persons, undisturbed mold is not a substantial health hazard. Mold is a greater hazard for persons with conditions such as impaired host defenses or mold allergies. To prevent exposure that could result in adverse health effects from disturbed mold, persons should: 

⦁    Avoid areas where mold contamination is obvious 


⦁    Use environmental controls 


⦁    Use personal protective equipment 


⦁    Keep hands, skin, and clothing clean and free from mold-contaminated dust 

 

 

Links:

 

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/doh/downloads/pdf/epi/epi-mold-guidelines.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5508a1.htm

 

Health Effects